Direct Presentation


In The Destructors, Graham Greene uses both indirect and direct character presentation to give the reader a sense of the characters in the story. The gang members are shown indirectly through their actions and dialogue, while the main character, Trevor, is shown directly through his thoughts and feeling.

Indirect character presentation is used extensively throughout The Destructors. The gang members are never actually seen as individuals; rather, they are only ever seen as a group. This is done through their actions and dialogue, which reveal their collective personality. For example, when the gang trashes Mr. Thomas’ house, it is clear that they are not doing it out of spite or anger, but simply because they enjoy destruction for its own sake. Their dialogue also reveals their collective personality, as they often speak in a crude and violent manner.

Direct character presentation is used less extensively, but is still present in the story. The main character, Trevor, is shown directly through his thoughts and feelings. For example, when he is planning to destroy Mr. Thomas’ house, he thinks about how much satisfaction he will get from it.

This shows that Trevor is not motivated by spite or anger, but rather by a desire to create destruction for its own sake. Trevor’s feelings are also shown directly when he feels remorse for what he has done after the house has been destroyed. This allows the reader to see Trevor as an individual, rather than simply as a member of the gang.

In conclusion, The Destructors uses both indirect and direct character presentation to give the reader a sense of the characters in the story. The gang members are shown indirectly through their actions and dialogue, while the main character, Trevor, is shown directly through his thoughts and feelings. This allows the reader to see the characters as multi-dimensional beings, rather than one-dimensional stereotypes.

In “The Destructors,” by Graham Greene, both indirect and direct presentation is utilized to give the characters in the tale a three-dimensional depiction. This technique works because each kind of representation provides a unique perspective on each personality.

The most prevalent form of indirect presentation is through the thoughts and actions of the characters. The reader is able to understand what each character is feeling and how they think by their actions. For example, when the gang is planning to destroy Old Misery’s house, T. allows his emotions to get in the way and does not want to participate. The other boys make fun of him and he eventually agrees to help, but his initial reaction shows that he does not have the same level of hatred for Old Misery as the rest of the gang.

Direct presentation is used less often, but it still plays an important role in revealing information about the characters. This is usually done through dialogue between the characters or inner monologues. An example of this is when Blackie is talking to the gang about their next target. He says that he wants to destroy a power station because it represents the “machine” that is taking over the world. This shows that Blackie is more interested in destruction for destruction’s sake and does not care about the people who will be affected by it.

Both indirect and direct character presentation are important in The Destructors because they provide different but equally important perspectives into the minds of the characters. The story would not be as effective if it was only told from one point of view.

The author conveys the characters directly by telling the reader information about them, and he or she demonstrates them indirectly by displaying what has occurred. Direct presentation allows for a deeper comprehension of the characters, while indirect presentation demands that readers draw conclusions based on dialogue and events in the tale.

The Destructors, written by Graham Greene, is a story that uses both direct and indirect character presentation in order to give the reader a more complete understanding of the characters.

The protagonist in The Destructors is Trevor, also known as T. He is a member of a gang of young boys who wreak havoc on their neighborhood. The author presents Trevor indirectly through his actions and dialogue. For example, when the gang is discussing what they will do with the house they are planning to destroy, Trevor says that he wants to “pull it down” (Greene 3).

This shows that Trevor is not only interested in destroying the house, but he also wants to cause harm to the people who live there. The author also presents Trevor indirectly when he describes the gang’s activities. The gang is described as “smashing windows, looting shops, setting fire to houses” (Greene 2). This shows that Trevor and the other members of the gang are violent and destructive.

The other main character in The Destructors is Mr. Thomas, the owner of the house that the gang plans to destroy. The author presents Mr. Thomas directly by telling the reader about his past and his current situation. For example, the author tells the reader that Mr. Thomas was once a famous architect but he is now living in poverty (Greene 4). The author also tells the reader that Mr. Thomas is very attached to his house and he does not want to leave it (Greene 4). This shows that Mr. Thomas is a prideful man who is unwilling to let go of his possessions.

In conclusion, The Destructors uses both direct and indirect character presentation in order to give the reader a more complete understanding of the characters. The direct presentation of Mr. Thomas allows the reader to understand his motivations and his relationships with the other characters in the story. The indirect presentation of Trevor allows the reader to see how Trevor’s actions and dialogue reveal his character traits.


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